Friday, April 30, 2010

Royal Netherlands Navy and Marine Corps anti-piracy ops.

I can't tell you how much I admire the innovation and "get the job done" attitude of the Royal Netherlands Navy and Marine Corps. They have taken a restrictive set of operating guidelines, tweaked them to their advantage and are doing more to curtail piracy than the 'Mighty' US, French, UK, Russian, Italian, S. Korean and Chinese Navies combined.


Update.

Marcase "translates" the video for us in the comments section.  I thought that it might prove useful for readers to place it in the body of this post.
Captain Ben Bekkering talks about how he deploys his boats. The six landing craft form two 'Afloat forward operating bases', which left during the dark so as not to tip off the pirate camps and stay 'forward' for a number of days, each AFOB covering a particular pirate camp.

The HNLMS deWitt got 'lucky' within four days after arrival. The intercepted skiffs clearly displayed pirate kit; ladders, extra fuel yet no fishing gear. Weapons are usually thrown over the side when coalition navy ships arrive. The pirates themselves are either released with their mothership, detained or dropped off at the beach via LCU.


video

3 comments:

  1. Captain Ben Bekkering talks about how he deploys his boats. The six landing craft form two 'Afloat forward operating bases', which left during the dark so as not to tip off the pirate camps and stay 'forward' for a number of days, each AFOB covering a particular pirate camp.

    The HNLMS deWitt got 'lucky' within four days after arrival. The intercepted skiffs clearly displayed pirate kit; ladders, extra fuel yet no fishing gear. Weapons are usually thrown over the side when coalition navy ships arrive. The pirates themselves are either released with their mothership, detained or dropped off at the beach via LCU.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Marcase, as I see it, it's more pr-stunt than real "innovation." Since the long awaited NH-90 helicopters haven't arrived yet, the remaining ten or so Lynx-helicopters are heavily pressed. Mostly at home. This is why the Johan de Witt lacks helicopters. The landing craft are presented as capable surrogates - and as camouflage for the ugly hiatus in helicoptercapability....

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yes, and no.
    When HNLMS de Witt was chosen for the Somalia deployment, plans were made to use the landing craft as demonstrated.
    However, back then (a year ago), two Lynx helicopters were also included in the original ops plan. So the only modification was the deletion of the Lynx (in in limited marpat and RRF role).

    But yes, the lack of helos is a disgrace for an aviation capable ship such as the LPD.

    ReplyDelete