Wednesday, February 10, 2010

BAE FRES SV



Its a new video, at least to me, of the offering from BAE.  I like the idea of mating the CV90 chassis to a new turret.  It looks good.

Is the Indian Army Cat 4???

Jon sent me a disturbing link to a story regarding the state of the Indian Army. From the article its easy to view the Indian Army as backwards and not yet ready for prime time...

First this...
At a recent closed door meeting to review the army's infantry, a general took the podium to explain the virtues of the standard issue hand grenade. In production in India since World War II, the pineapple shaped grenade is designed to explode and scatter 36 pieces of shrapnel. "But you'll be lucky if it breaks into two. You are better off throwing it at the head of the terrorist," the general said amidst polite laughter. His black humour was not without reason. Soldiers have flung the pineapple-sized explosive, the 36-M, at terrorists to see them walk away unscathed and the army has been known to use the China-and Pakistan-made hand grenades it recovers from terrorists.
and then this...
"The infantryman is poorly trained and equipped, high on bravado and low on equipment and training. I would give him a 3/10," says Lt-General H. S. Panag, former northern army commander. Poor equipment and training means ten army soldiers do the job that can be done by three. "The Shamshabari range in J&K can be covered by a single ambush of troops equipped with hands-free radios and night vision devices. My troops lack sufficient night vision devices (NVD) hence I have to set up three ambushes," the officer says

Amazing.  Perhaps before they focus on big ticket- high tech items, maybe they should get the basics right.

Note.  Below is the Unit Readiness tables used by the US Army via Global Security.org...

C-1. Unit possesses the required resources and is trained to undertake the full wartime mission. One should not be C-1 rated unless they know their potential destination and have properly planned for potential threats accordingly.
C-2. Unit possesses the resources and has accomplished the training necessary to undertake the bulk of the wartime mission. One is trained and has most equipment but lacks knowledge and preparation for the potential destination.
C-3. Unit possesses the resources but has only accomplished the training necessary to undertake major portions of wartime missions. The training accomplished fulfills the required areas of combat medicine but has not been tailored to a real world situation. Essential equipment is lacking.
C-4. Unit requires additional resources or training to undertake its mission. Definitely not ready at any level and cannot fulfill the mission in the event of war. Will take some time to be trained and equipped.
C-5. Unit is undergoing a service-directed resource change and is not prepared. Troops are neither trained nor has required gear been issued. Total unpreparedness.

Cobra Gold 2010...

More photos from the exercise...via DVIDS...

Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary L. Johnson IIIThe forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Essex receives supplies from the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Tippecanoe during an underway replenishment. Essex, commanded by Capt. Troy Hart, is part of the forward-deployed Essex Amphibious Ready Group and is participating in Cobra Gold 2010, a co-sponsored U.S.-Thailand multinational exercise.

Photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Geronimo AquinoThe amphibious assault ship USS Essex leads US, Thai and Korean ships in formation during Cobra Gold 2010; following Essex in order of formation are the royal Thai Navy medium landing ship HTMS Surin, the Republic of Korea navy tank landing ship Seongin Bong, the guided-missile cruiser USS Shiloh, the amphibious transport dock ship USS Denver and the amphibious dock landing ship USS Harpers Ferry not shown in the picture. Cobra Gold is an annual bilateral training exercise designed to train Thai, U.S., Republic of Korea and Singaporean task force personnel.

Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary L. Johnson III
A Korean amphibious assault vehicle moves onto the beach during a simulated amphibious assault as part of exercise Cobra Gold 2010. The assault included Marines, aircraft and landing crafts from the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Essex, the amphibious transport dock ship USS Denver and the dock landing ship USS Harper's Ferry. CG 10 is a U.S.-Thai sponsored, multinational exercise designed to enhance interoperability between U.S. and Pacific partner nations. Essex is part of the forward-deployed Essex Amphibious Ready Group and is conducting spring patrol. The Essex ARG is comprised of Amphibious Squadron Eleven, Essex, amphibious transport dock ship USS Denver, dock landing ship USS Harpers Ferry, and guided-missile cruiser USS Shiloh. The Essex ARG has the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit embarked, and this group reports to Commander, Amphibious Force Seventh Fleet, Rear Adm. Richard Landolt, who is headquartered in Okinawa, Japan.

Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary L. Johnson III
A landing craft, air cushion vehicle maneuvers on the beach during a simulated amphibious assault as part of exercise Cobra Gold 2010. Cobra Gold is a joint and coalition multinational exercise hosted annually by the Kingdom of Thailand.

Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary L. Johnson III
A Thai Marine climbs out of an amphibious assault vehicle during a simulated amphibious assault as part of exercise Cobra Gold 2010. The assault included Marines, aircraft and landing crafts from the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Essex, the amphibious transport dock ship USS Denver and the dock landing ship USS Harper's Ferry. CG 10 is a U.S.-Thai sponsored, multinational exercise designed to enhance interoperability between U.S. and Pacific partner nations. Essex is part of the forward-deployed Essex Amphibious Ready Group and is conducting spring patrol. The Essex ARG is comprised of Amphibious Squadron Eleven, Essex, amphibious transport dock ship USS Denver, dock landing ship USS Harpers Ferry, and guided-missile cruiser USS Shiloh. The Essex ARG has the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit embarked, and this group reports to Commander, Amphibious Force Seventh Fleet, Rear Adm. Richard Landolt, who is headquartered in Okinawa, Japan.

Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary L. Johnson III
Korean amphibious assault vehicles move across the beach during a simulated amphibious assault as part of exercise Cobra Gold 2010. The assault included Marines, aircraft and landing crafts from the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Essex, the amphibious transport dock ship USS Denver and the dock landing ship USS Harper's Ferry. CG 10 is a U.S.-Thai sponsored, multinational exercise designed to enhance interoperability between U.S. and Pacific partner nations. Essex is part of the forward-deployed Essex Amphibious Ready Group and is conducting spring patrol. The Essex ARG is comprised of Amphibious Squadron Eleven, Essex, amphibious transport dock ship USS Denver, dock landing ship USS Harpers Ferry, and guided-missile cruiser USS Shiloh. The Essex ARG has the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit embarked, and this group reports to Commander, Amphibious Force Seventh Fleet, Rear Adm. Richard Landolt, who is headquartered in Okinawa, Japan.

Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary L. Johnson III
Sailors assigned to the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Essex refuel an AS332 Super Puma helicopter during an underway replenishment with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Tippecanoe. Essex, commanded by Capt. Troy Hart, is part of the forward-deployed Essex Amphibious Ready Group and is participating in Cobra Gold 2010, a co-sponsored U.S.-Thailand multinational exercise.