Tuesday, December 20, 2011

Marines revolutionize the battlefield...again...





The US Marine Corps has a proud history of being "combat innovators"...It seems like that tradition continues...

via Ares...

Updated again on 12/20

Word has come down to me that the K-MAX has not only successfully completed its maiden cargo flight, but is in fact now fully operational. Open source reporting has said that there are two K-MAX unmanned helicopters in Afghanistan, which would presumably mean that both are up and running when and where they're needed. It also looks like they're probably only flying at night, according to information put out by NAVAIR.
“Most of the missions will be conducted at night and at higher altitudes,” said Marine Capt. Caleb Joiner, mission commander. “This will allow us to keep out of small arms range.”
[UPDATED]
On Saturday morning, the ISAF Joint Command (IJC) in Afghanistan confirmed that the K-MAX unmanned helicopter had (or will some time today) fly its first cargo mission in Afghanistan, meaning that if all goes well, we’re now in the age of unmanned logistics. In response to an email,the IJC writes back:
“The first unmanned flight without cargo was 15 December. It is scheduled for its first unmanned flight with cargo, today, 17 December.”
First to fight.

First to revolutionize the modern battlefield.


Terminal Lance...when you eat it..

Terminal Lance is crazy as hell...but speaks much truth!


But even funnier is the commentary that he provides....

…you’ll shit bricks.
Ask any Marine, Soldier, Airman or Sailor and they’ll tell you that the “Meal, Ready to Eat” (MRE) we’re issued every field op does excruciating and somewhat absurd things to the colon and bowels on its digestive quest through the body. I don’t think I’ve ever actually figured out what causes the phenomenon, or whether it’s intentional by the manufacturer (I say manufacturer, because I assure you… MRE’s are not “made” or “cooked”–they are manufactured). The side effect of fake ingredients and preservatives provides the average Marine with a few day’s worth of stored up, rock hard poop ready to wreak its wrath upon any nigh port-a-shitters.
There are two noteworthy benefits the infamous “MRE shit”:
  • You poop once every couple of days.
  • The “clean wipe”
I suppose being backed up for days on end is unusual and generally unwanted for the average person–I know that now, as a civilian, I value my morning coffee-poops like any red-blooded American should. However, when you’re sleeping in filth and you’re stuck in the field doing a lot of physical work, not having to excrete your bowels at a normal rate is good because it keeps you less likely to be in the head when shit goes downhill. God help you when you do–it will be a trip to the john you won’t forget. You’ll brace yourself, bite your lip and push with all the might and power that your creator has bestowed upon you to pass these epic shits. But when they’re done, their rock-solid composition has left your backside surprisingly clean.
This leads to the second benefit: the clean wipe. As mentioned, being in the field means you’ll be sleeping in your own filth and not bathing for days. What could be better than walking out of the head with your rectum as clean as you came in? Plus, it’s just cool to go for the wipe and come up white.

Composite Unit Training Exercise

All photos by Lance Cpl. Michael Petersheim

Marines and sailors with Alpha Company, Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, set up a command post using two Assault Amphibian Vehicles during a field training exercise aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., Dec. 18. The training was part of the Composite Training Unit Exercise, the second at-sea training period for 24th MEU, scheduled to take place Nov. 28 to Dec. 21. The training is meant to develop cohesion between the 24th MEU and Amphibious Squadron 8 in conducting amphibious operations, crisis response, and limited contingency operations while operating from the sea.

Marines and sailors with Alpha Company, Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit prepare to embark on Assault Amphibian Vehicles prior to conducting a mechanized assault from the USS New York (LPD-21) onto an enemy objective on land at Camp Lejeune, Dec. 18. The training was part of the Composite Training Unit Exercise, the second at-sea training period for 24th MEU, scheduled to take place Nov. 28 to Dec. 21. The training is meant to develop cohesion between the 24th MEU and Amphibious Squadron 8 in conducting amphibious operations, crisis response, and limited contingency operations while operating from the sea.

Lance Cpl. Richard Gonzalez, a radio operator with Alpha Company, Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, sets up a field radio antenna during a training exercise aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., Dec. 18. The training was part of the Composite Training Unit Exercise, the second at-sea training period for 24th MEU, scheduled to take place Nov. 28 to Dec. 21. The training is meant to develop cohesion between the 24th MEU and Amphibious Squadron 8 in conducting amphibious operations, crisis response, and limited contingency operations while operating from the sea. Gonzalez is a native of El Paso, Texas.

Sgt. Charles Wesley Hope, the chief armory custodian with Alpha Company, Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit ties rope around a stake to secure a field antenna during a field training exercise aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., Dec. 18. The training was part of the Composite Training Unit Exercise, the second at-sea training period for 24th MEU, scheduled to take place Nov. 28 to Dec. 21. The training is meant to develop cohesion between the 24th MEU and Amphibious Squadron 8 in conducting amphibious operations, crisis response, and limited contingency operations while operating from the sea. Hope is a native of Douglas County, Ga.

USS New York (LPD-21) positioned off the coast of Camp Lejeune, N.C., supporting Marines and sailors of the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit during an amphibious assault onto Camp Lejeune, Dec. 18. The USS New York launched a mechanized infantry company from the 24th MEU's battalion landing team and air support in the form of UH-1 Hueys and AH-1 Cobras, all of which are embarked on the ship during the three-week long Composite Training Unit Exercise. COMPTUEX, the second at-sea training period for 24th MEU and Amphibious Squadron 8, is focused on developing cohesion between the 24th MEU and PHIBRON 8 in conducting amphibious operations, crisis response, and limited contingency operations while operating from the sea.


An AH-1 Super Cobra, with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron VMM-261 (Rein), 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, flies to its objective in support of an amphibious assault during a training exercise aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., Dec. 18. The training was part of the Composite Training Unit Exercise, the second at-sea training period for 24th MEU, scheduled to take place Nov. 28 to Dec. 21. The training is meant to develop cohesion between the 24th MEU and Amphibious Squadron 8 in conducting amphibious operations, crisis response, and limited contingency operations while operating from the sea